This Month in History

Current Issue

April

On April 2, 1963, my first-born daughter, Melanie Ann Meyer, was born.

On April 13, 1929, my oldest brother, Eldor William Meyer, was born.

On April 24, 1894, my father, Heinrich Dietrich Wilhelm Meyer, was born.

On April 30, 1931, my sister Nelda Arlene Meyer Schoennauer was born.  (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

September

September is the time when we traditionally conclude the rites of summer with the long Labor Day weekend. Intended to be a salute to working people, Labor Day has become a celebration of the end of the vacation season, signaling that it’s time to go back to work. But it is also a warning to children that it’s time to hit the books and go back to school. The month of September does remind us that even though hard work may be difficult to digest at times, we all savor the fruits of our labors.  (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

On August First

In some parts of this country, the days of August have a special name: the dog days of summer. Not meant to demean the canine species, this designation is an apt description of the Sweltering month. . . It’s not uncommon to hear people barking about the heat and the humidity, nipping at comments as if they’re meant to be insults. (more…)

This Month in History

Current Issue

March

On March 1, 1360, the young English author Geoffrey Chaucer, who later wrote The Canterbury Tales, is ransomed during the Hundred Years’ War by King Edward III, who paid £16 for his release.

On March 1, 1546, Protestant reformer George Wishart is burned at the stake on orders of David Beaton, the Roman Catholic archbishop of St. Andrews, England.   (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

February

On February 1, 1587, Queen Elizabeth I of England signs the warrant of execution for Mary, Queen of Scots.

On February 1, 1789, Vietnamese forces drive Chinese troops from the Vietnamese capital of Thang Long.             

(more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

December

Christmas comes but once a year, and unluckily the Christmas shopping season lasts longer than that. There was a time when Christmas advertising didn’t appear in newspapers, magazines, or on television until the first week in December. Slowly, but surely, the kickoff date was moved to the day after Thanksgiving. It was then forwarded to just before Halloween. This acceleration continued, and some ads occurred shortly after Labor Day. At this progressive rate, we’ll be Christmas shopping all year long! (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

November

November is when the north winds begin to blow and herald the coming of winter. This month is also a time of migration: gray whales swim south to the warm waters of Mexico; ducks, geese, cranes, and even monarch butterflies fly south to escape the ice and snow: and many people now fly south to Florida and Arizona to warm their weary bones.

On November 1, 1492, Italian Explorer Christopher Columbus, realizing he is not in Japan, decides that Cuba is the Chinese Mainland.  (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

July

July is Freedom Month: Many nations—including our own—gained their freedom during this particular month of the year. Canada became a self-governing British dominion on this day in 1867. France had its first revolution on July 14. Nations such as Algeria, Argentina, Colombia, Belgium, Peru, Liberia and Venezuela also gained self-government and freedom during this month.

July 1, 1946, the first postwar atomic bomb test was conducted at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands by the United States. (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

April

April showers may bring May flowers, but most of us are too busy worrying about our taxes to stop and smell the daffodils, tulips, lilies, and hyacinths which are some of the most popular blossoms of spring.

April 1 – April Fool’s Day; This is the day when the aquarium receives a lot of phone calls for Mr. Fish, Salt and sugar get switched, quarters are occasionally glued to the sidewalk, and all sorts of improbable tales are told with a straight face in the hope of declaring listeners to be April Fools. (more…)

This Month in History

Past Issue

March: National Anthem; World Standard time

March 3, 1931. The Star Spangle Banner became the national anthem. The “Star Spangled Banner” was written in 1814. On this date in 1931, 117 year later, it officially became our national anthem. We were using the “The Star Spangled Banner” as our national anthem long before it became official.  There is no law that says we have to wait for Congress to move before we tackle a problem through other means.  (more…)